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Keep your home safe and comfortable with water heater products and service from AVS Plumbing & Heating.

Hot Water Costs and Cost-Cutters

hot-water-cost-savingsSome ways to save on water-heating bills require greater financial investments than others. You may wish to consider the no- or low-cost options before making large purchases. Also allow for circumstances that may be unique to your household when deciding on the appropriate options (e.g., a small-capacity washing machine could meet the needs of a one person household efficiently). Although it is not feasible to eliminate water heating in your home, it is possible to substantially reduce water-heating costs without sacrificing comfort and convenience.

Figuring Out How Much You Spend to Heat Your Water

The next time you pay your utility bill, try one simple calculation. Divide the total amount by seven. The result is the amount you spend to heat your water. (If you receive separate utility bills for gas and electricity, use the gas bill for this calculation if you have a gas water heater; use the electric bill if you have an electric water heater.)

Of course, you may think this cost is a small price to pay for the convenience of a hot shower. But during the course of a year, this cost adds up. And when you consider that 95 million households in this country pay the same percentage, it is easy to see how much money and energy is used to heat water.

Several measures can help you decrease water-heating costs in your home. Some specific actions include reducing the amount of hot water used, making your water-heating system more energy efficient, and using off-peak power to heat water.

Reducing the Amount of Hot Water Used

Generally, four destination points in the home are recognized as end uses for hot water: faucets, showers, dishwashers, and washing machines. Now, you do not have to take cold showers, dine on dirty dishes, or wear dirty clothes to reduce your hotwater consumption. Less radical measures are available that will be virtually unnoticeable once you apply them.

Faucets and Showers

Simply repairing leaks in faucets and showers can save hot water. A leak of one drip per second can cost $1 per month, yet could be repaired in a few minutes for less than that. And some apparently insignificant steps, when practiced routinely at your household, could have significant results. For example, turning the hot-water faucet off while shaving or brushing your teeth, as opposed to letting the water run, can also reduce water-heating costs. Another option is limiting the amount of time you spend in the shower. Other actions may require a small investment of time and money. Installing low-flow showerheads and faucet aerators can save significant amounts of hot water. Low-flow showerheads can reduce hot water consumption for bathing by 30%, yet still provide a strong, invigorating spray.

Faucet aerators, when applied in commercial and multifamily buildings where water is constantly circulated, can also reduce water-heating energy consumption. Older showerheads deliver 4 to 5 gallons of water per minute. Although a low-flow showerhead delivers slightly less water than a standard showerhead, the spray can still be invigorating.

A quick test can help you determine if your shower is a good candidate for a showerhead replacement: Turn on the shower to the normal pressure you use, hold a bucket that has been marked in gallon increments under the spray, and time how many seconds it takes to fill the bucket to the 1-gallon mark. If it takes less than 20 seconds, you could benefit from a low-flow showerhead. A top quality, low-flow showerhead will cost $10 to $20 and pay for itself in energy saved within 4 months. Lower quality showerheads may simply restrict water flow, which often results in poor performance.

Because of the different uses of bathroom and kitchen faucets, you may need to have different water flow rates in each location. For bathroom faucets, aerators that deliver 0.5 to 1 gallon of water per minute may be sufficient. Kitchen faucets may require a higher flow rate of 2 to 4 gallons per minute if you regularly fill the sink for washing dishes. On the other hand, if you tend to let the water run when washing dishes, the lower flow rate of 0.5 to 1 gallon per minute may be more appropriate. Some aerators come with shut-off valves that allow you to stop the flow of water without affecting the temperature.

Automatic Dishwashers

A relatively common assumption is that washing dishes by hand saves hot water. However, washing dishes by hand several times a day could be more expensive than operating some automatic dishwashers. If properly used, an efficient dishwasher can consume less energy than washing dishes by hand, particularly when you only operate the dishwasher with full loads.

The biggest cost of operating a dishwasher comes from the energy required to heat the water before it ever makes it to the machine. Heating water for an automatic dishwasher can represent about 80% of the energy required to run this appliance. Average dishwashers use 8 to 14 gallons of water for a complete wash cycle.

But, setting your water heater so high could result in excessive standby heat loss. This type of heat loss occurs because water is constantly heated in the storage tank, even when no hot water is used. Furthermore, a water heater temperature of 120-degrees F is sufficient for other uses of hot water in the home. The question, then, is must you give up effective cleaning for hotwater energy savings? The answer is no.

A “booster” heater can increase the temperature of the water entering the dishwasher to the 140-degrees F recommended for cleaning. Some dishwashers have built-in boosters that will automatically raise the water temperature, while others require manual selection before the wash cycle begins. A booster heater can add about $30 to the cost of a new dishwasher but should pay for itself in water-heating energy savings in about 1 year if you also lower your water heater temperature. Reducing the water heater temperature is not advisable, however, if your dishwasher does not have a booster heater.

Another feature that reduces hot-water use in dishwashers is the availability of cycle selections. Shorter cycles require less water, thereby reducing the energy cost. The most efficient dishwasher currently on the market can cost half as much to operate as the most inefficient model.

If you are planning to purchase a new dishwasher, check the EnergyGuide labels and compare the approximate yearly energy costs among brands. Dishwashers fall into one of two categories — compact capacity or standard capacity. Although compact capacity dishwashers may appear to be more energy efficient, they hold fewer dishes and may force you to use the appliance more frequently than you would use a standard-capacity model. In this case, your energy costs could be higher than with the standard-capacity dishwasher.

Turning the hot-water faucet off while shaving or brushing your teeth, as opposed to letting the water run, can reduce water-heating costs. An efficient automatic dishwasher can consume less energy than washing dishes by hand, particularly when you only operate the dishwasher with full loads.

Washing Machines

Like dishwashers, much of the cost – up to 90% – of operating washing machines is associated with the energy needed to heat the water. Unlike dishwashers, washing machines do not require a minimum temperature for optimum cleaning. Either cold or warm water can be used for washing most laundry loads; cold water is always sufficient for rinsing. Make sure you follow the cold-water washing instructions for your particular laundry detergent. Washing only full loads is another good rule of thumb for reducing hot-water consumption in clothes washers. As you would for dishwashers, consult the EnergyGuide labels when shopping for a new washing machine. Inefficient washing machines can cost three times as much to operate as efficient machines. Select a machine that allows you to adjust the water temperature and water levels for the size of the load. Also, front-loading machines use less water and, consequently, less energy than top loaders.

Smaller capacity washing machines often have better EnergyGuide ratings. However, a reduced capacity might cause you to increase the number of loads you wash and possibly increase your energy costs. Faucets, showerheads, dishwashers, and washing machines are only destination points for hot water in your home. The journey of your hot water before it reaches these outlets can be fraught with opportunities for energy losses. Fortunately, you can reduce the incidence of water heat loss from the point of departure to the point of arrival by applying a few basic measures.

 


What’s New in Water Heaters!

High Efficiency Water Heaters

gas-water-heater-cutawayNew innovations in water heaters are happening every day, with a special focus on energy efficiency. New high efficiency water heaters meet the hot water demands in your home in a high-tech way that saves on energy costs.

Tankless Water Heaters

tankless-water-heaterHomes and businesses that don't often have the need for multiple locations needing hot water simultaneously do well with tankless water heaters. Highly efficient, these water heaters instantly heat water on demand.

Hybrid Water Heaters

hybrid-gas-water-heaterHybrid water heaters perform like tankless models, but can also handle high hot water demand periods. You get the best of both worlds - high efficiency and all the hot water you need, just when you need it.